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    FARM LIFE IN 2020?

     

    Farm Life in 2020?

    Over this holiday vacation, and while driving into other states, the discussion about farmers came up with Michigan friends and I had to research it. So..here are 5 Reasons Farm Life is a Good Life, especially in Michigan!

    Michigan is known for many things, but maybe the most under-the-radar industry is the state's diverse agriculture scene. Michigan farming not only provides consumers with food and fiber on nearly 10 million acres of farmland, but it also lays the foundation for a dynamic food and agriculture industry, substantially contributing to the state's economy each year. Farms for sale in Michigan included approximately 10,740 acres of farms for sale based on recent Land And Farm data. Along with public hunting lands, Michigan boasts over two million acres of private land managed as commercial forest for hunters to track white-tailed deer, elk, bear, grouse, and more. 

     

    One of the best pros of living on a farm is the absence of certain things. Car horns, sirens, loud music, the odor of exhaust fumes and traffic in general. Watching things grow can be neat, seeing the first sprouts of a newly planted field, seeing the first blooms, plucking the first ripe tomato or cucumber and eating it. Seeing fields wither in hot dry weather, seeing the ground covered with sheep’s spur weeds, and seeing insects devouring the sweet corn are things we don’t really want to see, but they are all nature at work, even seeing the less glorified, less glamorous is even good. 

     

     

    1. Family Affair

    No matter what the job, everybody has a way to pitch in. It might be driving a truck and trailer to haul hay to another farm. It might be picking up corn from the feed mill to feed the cows. It might be checking the cows’ water before dark so they have time to thaw it if it’s frozen. It might be climbing in the cracked corn to help scoop it out into the big buckets. It might be getting dinner ready so everyone has a hot meal at the end of the day. Whatever is going on, everybody helps out and wants to, as this is their literal bread and butter.

     

     

    2. Vegetables

    Having the ability to go out and pick items for salad or your side for lunch is unmatched by anything. Just like dairy, there's a difference between going to the store and buying vegetables and hand growing it. Hard work always pays off, and tastes better too!

     

     

    3. Health

    Living on a farm will result in a healthier immune system. Growing up on a farm helps reduce the body’s immunological responses to food proteins. In layman’s term, it means those who grow up on a farm have a reduced likelihood of developing an allergic disease. When you live on a farm, you develop more regulatory T-lymphocytes. These are cells that pacify immune responses and limit inflammation. Allergies, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases develop when these cells are reduced. Growing up on a farm most certainly would have benefitted me! I have become an allergy queen!

     

    4. Animals

    Animals teach children about life and death and responsibility...and that the show must go on. When they are sick, those animals still need to be taken care of. Even when a family member dies the animals still need them. Even days when they don't feel like taking care of the animal, it doesn't change the fact that the animal must still be taken care of. It is the only way the farm and the farmers can thrive. I have been a vegan/vegetarian/pescatarian most of my life but I understand that those that live and work with animals as a means of production have their own beliefs and hopefully choose the most humane conditions.

     

    5. Fresh Air

    Away from the pollution of the cities, you will be able to walk out of your house every morning and smell the fresh air.  You will find that your washing on the line stays fresher and cleaner, as it is not subjected to pollution. Not having to breathe in car fumes all the time is a huge benefit. Farm life is actually #ecoglam




     

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